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While the magazine in general reports corruption, self-interest and incompetence in a broad range of industries and lines of work, certain people and entities have received a greater amount of attention and coverage in its pages.

As the most visible public figures, prime ministers and senior politicians make the most natural targets, but Private Eye also aims its criticism at journalists, newspapers and prominent or interesting businesspeople.

It is the habit of the magazine to attach nicknames, usually offensive or crude, to these people, and often to create surreal and extensive alternate personifications of them, which usually take the form of parody newspaper articles in the second half of the magazine.

Private Eye has regularly and extensively reported on and investigated a wide range of far-reaching issues, including:. A series of parody columns referring to the Prime Minister of the day has been a long-term feature of Private Eye.

While generally satirical, during the s, Ingrams and John Wells wrote an affectionate series of fictional letters from Denis Thatcher to Bill Deedes in the Dear Bill column, mocking Thatcher as an amiable, golf-playing drunk.

The column was collected in a series of books and became a stage-play "Anyone For Denis? In The Back is an investigative journalism section notably associated with pioneering journalist Paul Foot [17] the Eye has always published its investigative journalism at the back of the magazine.

Nooks and Corners originally Nooks and Corners of the New Barbarism , an architectural column severely critical of architectural vandalism and "barbarism", [21] notably modernism and brutalism , [22] was originally founded by John Betjeman in his first article attacked a building praised by his enemy Nikolaus Pevsner [23] and carried on by his daughter Candida Lycett Green.

Street of Shame is a two-page column addressing journalistic misconduct and excesses, [27] [28] hypocrisy, and undue influence by proprietors and editors, mostly sourced from tipoffs [29] — it sometimes serves as a venue for the settling of scores within the trade, [30] and is a source of friction with editors.

There are also several recurring miniature sections. A special issue was published in to mark the death of long-time contributor Paul Foot.

The magazine has a number of recurring in-jokes and convoluted references, often comprehensible only to those who have read the magazine for many years.

They include euphemisms designed to avoid notoriously plaintiff-friendly English libel laws, such as replacing the word "drunk" with " tired and emotional ", [35] [36] or using the phrase "Ugandan discussions" to denote illicit sexual exploits; [35] and more obvious parodies utilising easily recognisable stereotypes, such as the lampooning as " Sir Bufton Tufton " of Conservative MPs.

Such terms have sometimes fallen into disuse as their hidden meanings have become better-known. The magazine often deliberately misspells the names of certain organisations, such as "Crapita" for the outsourcing company Capita , "Carter-Fuck" for the law firm Carter-Ruck , and " The Grauniad " for The Guardian the latter a reference to the newspaper's typos in its days as The Manchester Guardian.

The first half of each issue of the magazine, which consists chiefly of news reporting and investigative journalism , tends to include these in-jokes in a more subtle manner, so as to maintain journalistic integrity, while the second half, generally characterised by unrestrained parody and cutting humour, tends to present itself in a more confrontational way.

Private Eye has from time to time produced various spin-offs from the magazine, including:. Some have found the magazine's irreverence and sometimes controversial humour offensive.

Under this headline was a picture of many hundreds of people outside Buckingham Palace , with one person commenting that the papers were "a disgrace", another agreeing, saying that it was impossible to get one anywhere, and another saying, "Borrow mine.

It's got a picture of the car. Following the abrupt change in reporting from newspapers immediately following her death, the issue also featured a mock retraction from "all newspapers" of everything negative that they had ever said about Diana.

This was enough to cause a flood of complaints and the temporary removal of the magazine from the shelves of some newsagents.

These included WHSmith , which had previously refused to stock Private Eye until well into the s, and was characterised in the magazine as "WH Smugg" or "WH Smut" on account of its policy of stocking pornographic magazines.

The "Diana issue" is now one of the most highly sought-after back-issues. The issues that followed the Ladbroke Grove rail crash in number , the September 11 attacks of number ; the magazine even including a special "subscription cancellation coupon" for disgruntled readers to send in and the Soham murders of all attracted similar complaints.

During the early s Private Eye published many stories on the MMR vaccine controversy , substantially supporting the interpretation by Andrew Wakefield of published research in The Lancet by the Royal Free Hospital 's Inflammatory Bowel Disease Study Group, which described an apparent link between the vaccine and autism and bowel problems.

Many of these stories accused medical researchers who supported the vaccine's safety of having conflicts of interest because of funding from the pharmaceutical industry.

Initially dismissive of Wakefield, the magazine rapidly moved to support him, in publishing a page MMR Special Report that supported Wakefield's assertion that MMR vaccines "should be given individually at not less than one year intervals.

A doubting parent who reads this might be convinced there is a genuine problem and the absence of any proper references will prevent them from checking the many misleading statements.

In a review article published in , after Wakefield was disciplined by the General Medical Council , regular columnist Phil Hammond , who contributes to the "Medicine Balls" column under the pseudonym "MD", stated that: " Private Eye got it wrong in its coverage of MMR", in maintaining its support for Wakefield's position long after shortcomings in his work had emerged.

The cover of issue in showed Emperor Hirohito visiting Britain with the caption "A nasty nip in the air", and the subheading "Piss off, Bandy Knees".

In the s and s the magazine mocked the gay rights movement and feminism. The magazine mocked the Gay Liberation Front [54] and gay rights activism as " Poove Power" [55] popularizing the term "poove" as a derogatory insult for gay men [56] , and published feminist material under the title "Loony Feminist Nonsense".

Senior figures in the trade union movement have accused the publication of having a classist anti-union bias, with Unite chief of staff Andrew Murray describing Private Eye as "a publication of assiduous [ sic ] public school boys" and adding that it has "never once written anything about trade unions that isn't informed by cynicism and hostility".

Its mix of humour and investigation has tirelessly challenged the hypocrisy of the elite. But it also has serious weaknesses.

Among the witty — if sometimes tired — spoof articles and cartoons, there is a nasty streak of snobbery and prejudice. Its jokes about the poor, women and young people rely on lazy stereotypes you might expect from the columns of the Daily Mail.

It is the anti-establishment journal of the establishment. The Christmas issue received a number of complaints after it featured Pieter Bruegel 's painting of a nativity scene , in which one wise man said to another: "Apparently, it's David Blunkett 's" who at the time was involved in a scandal in which he was thought to have impregnated a married woman.

Many readers sent letters accusing the magazine of blasphemy and anti-Christian attitudes. One stated that the "witless, gutless buggers wouldn't dare mock Islam ".

It has, however, regularly published Islam-related humour such as the cartoon which portrayed a "Taliban careers master asking a pupil: What would you like to be when you blow up?

Many letters in the first issue of disagreed with the former readers' complaints, and some were parodies of those letters, "complaining" about the following issue's cover [61] — a cartoon depicting Santa 's sleigh shredded by a wind farm : one said: "To use a picture of Our Lord Father Christmas and his Holy Reindeer being torn limb from limb while flying over a windfarm is inappropriate and blasphemous.

In November , Private Eye 's official website appeared on a controversial list of over "fake news" websites compiled by Melissa Zimdars, a US lecturer.

Private Eye has long been known for attracting libel lawsuits, which in English law can lead to the award of damages relatively easily.

The publication maintains a large quantity of money as a "fighting fund" although the magazine frequently finds other ways to defuse legal tensions, for example by printing letters from aggrieved parties.

As editor since , Ian Hislop is reportedly one of the most sued people in Britain. The first person to successfully sue Private Eye was the writer Colin Watson , who objected to the magazine's description of him as "the little-known author who For the tenth anniversary issue in number , the cover showed a cartoon headstone inscribed with a long list of well-known names, and the epitaph: "They did not sue in vain".

In the case of Arkell v. Pressdram , the plaintiff was the subject of an article. We note that Mr Arkell's attitude to damages will be governed by the nature of our reply and would therefore be grateful if you would inform us what his attitude to damages would be, were he to learn that the nature of our reply is as follows: fuck off.

Pressdram ". Another litigation case against the magazine was initiated in by James Goldsmith , who managed to arrange for criminal libel charges to be brought, meaning that, if found guilty, those behind the Eye could be imprisoned.

He sued over allegations that members of the Clermont Set , including Goldsmith, had conspired to shelter Lord Lucan after Lucan had murdered his family nanny, Sandra Rivett.

Goldsmith won a partial victory and eventually reached a settlement with the magazine. The case threatened to bankrupt Private Eye , which turned to its readers for financial support in the form of a "Goldenballs Fund".

Goldsmith himself was referred to as "Jaws". The solicitor involved in many litigation cases against Private Eye , including the Goldsmith case, was Peter Carter-Ruck ; [72] to this day the magazine refers to the firm of solicitors as "Carter-Fuck".

Robert Maxwell sued the magazine for the suggestion he looked like a criminal, and won a significant sum. Editor Hislop summarised the case: "I've just given a fat cheque to a fat Czech", and later claimed this was the only known example of a joke being told on News at Ten.

Sonia Sutcliffe sued after allegations made in January that she used her connection to her husband, the "Yorkshire Ripper" Peter Sutcliffe , to make money.

Later, in Sonia Sutcliffe's libel case against the News of the World in , details emerged which demonstrated that she had benefited financially from her husband's crimes, even though Private Eye ' s facts had been inaccurate.

In , Gordon Anglesea, a retired police inspector, successfully sued the Eye and three other media outlets for libel over published allegations that he had indecently assaulted under-aged boys in Wrexham in the s.

In October , he was convicted of historic sex offences. Private Eye will not be looking to get our money back from the libel damages.

Others have paid a far higher price. A rare victory for the magazine came in late , when a libel case brought against it by a Cornish chartered accountant , Stuart Condliffe, finally came to trial after ten years.

The case was thrown out after only a few weeks as Condliffe had effectively accused his own legal team, Carter-Ruck, of lying.

In , Private Eye successfully challenged an injunction brought against it by Michael Napier, the former head of the Law Society , who had sought to claim "confidentiality" for a report that he had been disciplined by the Law Society in relation to a conflict of interest.

The magazine is owned by an eclectic group of people and is published by a limited company, Pressdram Ltd, [82] which was bought as an "off the shelf" company by Peter Cook in November Private Eye does not publish explicit details of individuals concerned with its upkeep, and does not contain a list of its editors, writers and designers.

In the book The Private Eye Story stated that the owners were Cook, who owned most of the shares, with smaller shareholders including the actors Dirk Bogarde and Jane Asher , and several of those involved with the founding of the magazine.

Most of those on the list have since died, however, and it is unclear what happened to their shareholdings. Those concerned are reputedly contractually only able to sell their shares at the price they originally paid for them.

Shareholders as of the annual company return dated 31 March [update] , including shareholders who have inherited shares, are:.

Within its pages the magazine always refers to its owner as the mythical proprietor "Lord Gnome", a satirical dig at autocratic press barons.

The magazine's masthead features a cartoon logo of an armoured knight, Gnitty, with a bent sword, parodying the "Crusader" logo of the Daily Express.

The logo for the magazine's news page is a donkey-riding naked Mr Punch caressing his erect and oversized penis, while hugging a female admirer.

It is a detail from a frieze by "Dickie" Doyle that once formed the masthead of Punch magazine, which the editors of Private Eye had come to loathe for its perceived descent into complacency.

The image, hidden away in the detail of the frieze, had appeared on the cover of Punch for nearly a century and was noticed by Malcolm Muggeridge during a guest-editing spot on Private Eye.

The " Rabelaisian gnome", as the character was called, was enlarged by Gerald Scarfe , and put on the front cover of issue 69 in at full size.

He was then formally adopted as a mascot on the inside pages, as a symbol of the old, radical incarnation of Punch magazine that the Eye admired.

The masthead text was designed by Matthew Carter , who would later design the popular webfonts Verdana and Georgia , and the Windows 95 interface font Tahoma.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Private Eye magazine. For other uses, see Private eye disambiguation.

British satirical and current affairs magazine. A July cover following the closure of the News of the World , making ironic use of a famous headline from The Sun.

Main article: List of people and organisations frequently parodied by Private Eye. Main article: Recurring in-jokes in Private Eye.

See also: List of fake news websites. Archived from the original on 13 June Retrieved 13 June Private Eye.

Archived from the original on 14 June Retrieved 16 June Retrieved 13 August The Guardian. Archived from the original on 7 October Retrieved 28 March Press Gazette.

The New York Times. The Observer. Retrieved 28 October Archived from the original on 28 November Retrieved 12 December Archived from the original on 19 September Retrieved 15 August The Times.

London: Bloomsbury. Introduction, note 6. The Economist. Why did Sushant change SIM card '50 times a month'?

Sushant Singh death: Police to test cloth used. Save and invest wisely to make your money work for you. Latest In. New UAE government structure to be announced tomorrow.

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Later, in Sonia Sutcliffe's libel case against the News of the World in , details emerged which demonstrated that she had benefited financially from her husband's crimes, even though Private Eye ' s facts had been inaccurate.

In , Gordon Anglesea, a retired police inspector, successfully sued the Eye and three other media outlets for libel over published allegations that he had indecently assaulted under-aged boys in Wrexham in the s.

In October , he was convicted of historic sex offences. Private Eye will not be looking to get our money back from the libel damages.

Others have paid a far higher price. A rare victory for the magazine came in late , when a libel case brought against it by a Cornish chartered accountant , Stuart Condliffe, finally came to trial after ten years.

The case was thrown out after only a few weeks as Condliffe had effectively accused his own legal team, Carter-Ruck, of lying.

In , Private Eye successfully challenged an injunction brought against it by Michael Napier, the former head of the Law Society , who had sought to claim "confidentiality" for a report that he had been disciplined by the Law Society in relation to a conflict of interest.

The magazine is owned by an eclectic group of people and is published by a limited company, Pressdram Ltd, [82] which was bought as an "off the shelf" company by Peter Cook in November Private Eye does not publish explicit details of individuals concerned with its upkeep, and does not contain a list of its editors, writers and designers.

In the book The Private Eye Story stated that the owners were Cook, who owned most of the shares, with smaller shareholders including the actors Dirk Bogarde and Jane Asher , and several of those involved with the founding of the magazine.

Most of those on the list have since died, however, and it is unclear what happened to their shareholdings. Those concerned are reputedly contractually only able to sell their shares at the price they originally paid for them.

Shareholders as of the annual company return dated 31 March [update] , including shareholders who have inherited shares, are:.

Within its pages the magazine always refers to its owner as the mythical proprietor "Lord Gnome", a satirical dig at autocratic press barons.

The magazine's masthead features a cartoon logo of an armoured knight, Gnitty, with a bent sword, parodying the "Crusader" logo of the Daily Express.

The logo for the magazine's news page is a donkey-riding naked Mr Punch caressing his erect and oversized penis, while hugging a female admirer.

It is a detail from a frieze by "Dickie" Doyle that once formed the masthead of Punch magazine, which the editors of Private Eye had come to loathe for its perceived descent into complacency.

The image, hidden away in the detail of the frieze, had appeared on the cover of Punch for nearly a century and was noticed by Malcolm Muggeridge during a guest-editing spot on Private Eye.

The " Rabelaisian gnome", as the character was called, was enlarged by Gerald Scarfe , and put on the front cover of issue 69 in at full size.

He was then formally adopted as a mascot on the inside pages, as a symbol of the old, radical incarnation of Punch magazine that the Eye admired.

The masthead text was designed by Matthew Carter , who would later design the popular webfonts Verdana and Georgia , and the Windows 95 interface font Tahoma.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Private Eye magazine. For other uses, see Private eye disambiguation.

British satirical and current affairs magazine. A July cover following the closure of the News of the World , making ironic use of a famous headline from The Sun.

Main article: List of people and organisations frequently parodied by Private Eye. Main article: Recurring in-jokes in Private Eye.

See also: List of fake news websites. Archived from the original on 13 June Retrieved 13 June Private Eye. Archived from the original on 14 June Retrieved 16 June Retrieved 13 August The Guardian.

Archived from the original on 7 October Retrieved 28 March Press Gazette. The New York Times. The Observer. Retrieved 28 October Archived from the original on 28 November Retrieved 12 December Archived from the original on 19 September Retrieved 15 August The Times.

London: Bloomsbury. Introduction, note 6. The Economist. Archived from the original on 4 March BBC News. Archived from the original on 24 January Retrieved 23 January Archived from the original on 16 June Archived from the original on 26 June Retrieved 25 June Archived from the original on 28 June Archived from the original on 25 June Archived from the original on 26 September Retrieved 15 June The BMJ : Archived from the original on 7 March Retrieved 28 April Research in Developmental Disabilities.

Archived from the original on 16 April Pressdram Ltd : February Archived from the original on 15 August Retrieved 24 May Archived from the original on 27 October The New Yorker.

New Yorker Magazine, Inc. May Allen Lane. Archived from the original on 20 November Come on Down? Unite chief of staff Andrew Murray made much of the Eye's coverage of [the expulsion of David Beaumont from Unite], telling the panel: " Private Eye is Socialist Worker Socialist Workers Party.

Archived from the original on 3 June Retrieved 2 May The Independent. Archived from the original on 15 January Retrieved 14 January International Business Times UK.

Archived from the original on 20 December Retrieved 13 December Private Eye Pressdram Ltd. November—December Archived from the original on 4 July Retrieved 13 July London, UK.

Archived from the original on 21 October Retrieved 22 July Archived from the original on 10 May Retrieved 5 January Archived from the original on 24 September Retrieved 7 May National Association of Science Writers.

London: Pressdram Ltd : October Mr Callaghan is referred to the Eye's reply in the famous case of Arkell v. Pressdram Archived from the original on 23 December Retrieved 15 March Archived from the original on 10 January Retrieved 10 January London: Pan Macmillan.

Retrieved 11 August Archived from the original on 12 May Archived from the original on 5 November Retrieved 5 November A one-minute trailer is already out, giving a sense of the deadpan humour the film, which sees Waititi playing Hitler, appears to be targeting.

One scene sees the imaginary Hitler comforting the boy after he is called scared by his peers by drawing on his own past experiences. He follows the comments with a shrug.

The cast includes a number of big-name actors, including Oscar-winner Sam Rockwell and Bafta-winner Scarlett Johansson, and is due out in the autumn.

Fox has overseen a number of notable flops since joining Disney, including X-Men: Dark Phoenix and the action comedy Stuber.

Disney, meanwhile, has been enjoying a record-breaking run of blockbuster hits, including Avengers: Endgame, Aladdin and The Lion King.

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